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31 Aircraft mark The Queen's 90th Birthday with flypast Featured Print

31 Aircraft mark The Queen's 90th Birthday with flypast

Image of the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, (Red Arrows) approaching the Mall, towards Buckingham Palace. They took part in the celebrations for the Queen's Birthday Flypast on 11 June 2016.
The Red Arrows, officially known as the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, is the aerobatics display team of the Royal Air Force based at RAF Scampton. The team was formed in late 1964 as an all-RAF team, replacing a number of unofficial teams that had been sponsored by RAF commands.
The Red Arrows have a prominent place in British popular culture, with their aerobatic displays a fixture of British summer events. The badge of the Red Arrows shows the aircraft in their trademark diamond nine formation, with the motto clat, a French word meaning "brilliance" or "excellence".
Initially, they were equipped with seven Folland Gnat trainers inherited from the RAF Yellowjacks display team. This aircraft was chosen because it was less expensive to operate than front-line fighters. In their first season, they flew at 65 shows across Europe.
In 1966, the team was increased to nine members, enabling them to develop their Diamond Nine formation. In late 1979, they switched to the BAE Hawk trainer. The Red Arrows have performed over 4, 700 displays in 56 countries worldwide.

Two Typhoon FGR4 aircraft, flown by 29 (R) Squadron from RAF Coningsby Featured Print

Two Typhoon FGR4 aircraft, flown by 29 (R) Squadron from RAF Coningsby

Image of two Typhoon FGR4 aircraft, flown by 29 (R) Squadron from RAF Coningsby. The Typhoon in the foreground (bottom) can been seen with the RAF 100 colours painted on its tail, to commemorate the Royal Air Force Centenary Celebrations.
The Typhoon FGR.Mk 4 is a highly capable and extremely agile fourth-generation multi-role combat aircraft, capable of being deployed for the full spectrum of air operations, including air policing, peace support and high-intensity conflict. Initially deployed in the air-to-air role as the Typhoon F.Mk 2, the aircraft now has a potent, precision multi-role capability as the FGR4. The pilot performs many essential functions through the aircrafts hands on throttle and stick (HOTAS) interface which, combined with an advanced cockpit and the Helmet Equipment Assembly (HEA), renders Typhoon superbly equipped for all aspects of air operations.
Although Typhoon has flown precision attack missions in all its combat deployments to date, its most essential role remains the provision of quick reaction alert (QRA) for UK and Falkland Islands airspace. Detachments have also reinforced NATO air defence in the Baltic and Black Sea regions.

100 years of the RAF Featured Print

100 years of the RAF

Pictured are three Fairey IIIFs of 47 Squadron on the Blue Nile at Khartoum before departing for a series of exploratory flights over Southern Sudan on 8 July 1930.
The aircraft pictured are J9796, J9809 and J9802.
The Fairey Aviation Company Fairey III was a family of British reconnaissance biplanes that enjoyed a very long production and service history in both landplane and seaplane variants.
The RAF used the IIIF to equip general-purpose squadrons in Egypt, Sudan, Aden and Jordan, where its ability to operate from both wheels and floats proved useful, while the contemporary Westland Wapiti carried out similar roles in Iraq and India.
As such IIIFs were used for colonial policing as well as taking part in further long-distance flights. The RAF also used the IIIF to finally replace the Airco DH.9A in the home-based Day-Bomber role, and, in the absence of sufficient long range flying boats for maritime patrol duties by 202 Squadron from Hal Far Malta.
The IIIF remained in front line service well into the 1930s, with the last front-line RAF squadron, 202 Squadron, re-equipping with Supermarine Scapas in August 1935, and the final front line Fleet Air Arm squadron, 822 Squadron retained the IIIF until 1936.
*Some of these images have had some dodging and burning done and have been retouched to remove detritus and dust and scratch marks only*

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